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Jim Larranaga: 'I am Coach-3' in FBI college basketball probe

University of Miami coach Jim Larranaga said his legal team believes he is “Coach-3,” as noted in the Department of Justice report about the FBI investigation into college basketball’s underbelly.

>> Read more trending news

“I am grateful we have come to that conclusion,” said Larranaga, “as I know I did nothing wrong, and it is comforting to know none of my assistants are connected in any way.” He added that the U.S. attorney’s office has not confirmed the identity of “Coach-3.”

In a news conference at the Watsco Center, Larranaga addressed the media for the first time since the Sept. 26 complaint was unveiled in New York. Uncharacteristically, he read from a prepared statement. He fielded questions afterward from reporters about the emotional impact, but referred all inquiries about the investigation to his statement, which said he appreciated that the media had a job to do, but that he would not offer comment.

Larranaga’s full statement: 

“I cannot state more emphatically that I absolutely have no knowledge of any wrongdoing by any member of our staff and I certainly have never engaged in the conduct that some have speculated about,” Larranaga said, holding a piece of paper with both hands.

“I have tried to live every single one of my 68 years on this earth with integrity, character, and humility. … To have those values that I cherish so dearly even questioned, is disheartening and disappointing.”

“Coach-3,” in the FBI report, was said to know about an Adidas executive and others conspiring to funnel some $150,000 to a 2018 recruit, later learned to be Orlando-based five-star wing Nassir Little. Little and his father signed statements, provided to The Post by Larranaga’s legal team, saying they accepted no money, never discussed payment with any of the men charged, and they and Miami did nothing wrong.

>> Related: Auburn, Oklahoma State, USC coaches among 10 charged with corruption

Asked about his relationship with former Adidas executive Jim Gatto, who was one of 10 men indicted by the FBI on conspiracy and fraud charges, Larranaga declined to comment, referring to the statement.

“It’s been a strain, physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually,” Larranaga said. “It’s something that’s there. I have to deal with it. I have the support of my wife and a wonderful family. I have the support of the university, my staff and players.”

Both Ja’Quan Newton and Bruce Brown, the two players Miami made available to the media, said they were not aware of the details of the investigation. They said practice has been as usual, and they’ve noticed no change in their coach.

“Around us, ‘Coach L’ isn’t going to show he’s hurt,” Newton said. “He’s so happy to be around us.”

Larranaga said he briefed his players on Sept. 26, along with UM Athletics Director Blake James.

“They have nothing to do with this,” Larranaga said. “It hasn’t been talked about since.”

Asked how the investigation has affected recruiting, Larranaga said it has been a negative, but his staff is “very strong and resilient, and we’ll figure out a way to recruit successfully.”

UM does not have a verbal commitment for 2018. It had an official visit set up the weekend of Sept. 9 with five-star point guard Immanuel Quickley, but it was canceled when Hurricane Irma forced UM to evacuate the campus.

Asked if he has received messages of support from colleagues, Larranaga answered, “Yes.”

Asked if that has helped, Larranaga answered with the same flat, “Yes.”

Florida police find body of missing 3-year-old in water-holding tank

Police say a 3-year-old boy from Arlington, Florida, who went missing Sunday while attending a birthday party with friends and family, was found hours later in an underground water-holding tank.

>> Read more trending news

Police said Amari Harley was reported missing around 4:45 p.m. Sunday after family searched for him when they could not locate him at a large family gathering at Bruce Park in Jacksonville, Florida.

Investigators said they got a tip to check an underground water-holding tank inside the park, which they said is large enough for a small child to slip into. 

Once the tank was drained, investigators located the body of a small child that matched the description of Amari. Police announced that the boy's body had been found around 8:45 p.m.

The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office continues to investigate the circumstances surrounding the death of the boy. 

“During the short investigation, we have attempted to make contact with everyone that was at the park during the time Amari went missing. We have spoken to numerous witnesses that were present. However, due to the size of the park and the multiple events going on at the time, we believe there are others that may have pertinent information that could assist detectives in this case,” authorities said. 

A spokesperson for Mayor Lenny Curry released a statement Monday saying the city is assisting in the investigation into Amari’s death.

The city will be also be investigating how Amari got into the water tank, according to the spokesperson.

“We are incredibly saddened by this tragedy. As JSO conducts its investigation, the city is assisting them by providing any information that will lead to a thorough and full review. The safety and security of visitors to city parks are paramount. The city will also be inspecting how this tragedy occurred, to ensure that all City parks are safe and secure,” the spokesperson said.

Amari’s loved ones told Action News Jax that they don’t understand how he got inside a water tank at the park.

City employees worked Monday to place new coverings on the tank.

Read more at ActionNewsJax.com

Men accused of pouring insecticide in Walmart toy department

Two men are accused of pouring insecticide in the children's toy department of a Tennessee Walmart over the weekend, according to authorities.

>> Read more trending news

Millington police said the incident happened Sunday. 

The men were seen on video "vandalizing property and intentionally spilling insecticide chemicals in the children's toy department," according to a news release.

Officers said the men left the scene in a white pick-up truck that had two stripes down the center.

Authorities continued to search for the men Monday.

Janet Jackson fans not happy about Justin Timberlake Super Bowl Halftime show

When Justin Timberlake announced Sunday he would be performing at the 2018 Super Bowl halftime show, the first thought for many was: Will Janet Jackson join Timberlake during the performance?

Before the NFL or Timberlake could respond, livid fans took to social media to dispute the league’s decision to give the singer with a halftime spot and not Jackson.

>> Read more trending news

In 2004, the duo performed during the Super Bowl XXXVIII halftime, but as the two ended Timberlake’s “Rock Your Body,” a wardrobe malfunction revealed Jackson’s nipple for less than a second, spawning what now is referred to as the “Nipplegate” scandal.

The FCC nightmare led to the now-standard video delay during live events. Many argue Timberlake was not negatively affected by the scandal like Jackson was. Rolling Stone reported that the incident at the show, which was produced by MTV, led to a blacklisting of the artist by Viacom, MTV’s parent company, and CBS, the network the halftime show aired on. The blacklisting reportedly led to dismal record sales for Jackson’s “Damita Jo” LP and a dark cloud over the performance until this day.

Related: Justin Timberlake will headline Super Bowl LII halftime show

In light of the impactof the controversial moment, some fans found issue with the NFL inviting one-half of the duo back for a second shot at a drama-free performance. Such concerns were expressed on Twitter.

Some even sensed a racial undertone to the missing invitation for a Janet Jackson performance.

NFL officials cleared up the rumors Monday afternoon that Jackson is banned from performing. 

Related: Justin Timberlake will headline Super Bowl LII halftime show

“No ban, no,” NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy told CNN. He declined comment on “any speculation regarding potential guests,” and he said there may be no guests. McCarthy went on to describer Timberlake as the “ultimate global superstar.”

Timberlake has not yet announced whether he plans to invite Jackson as a special guest. Jackson is currently traveling across the U.S. for her State of the World North American Tour.

Wanted Utah mother captured, arrested after 13-day-old son’s death

A Utah woman wanted in connection with the death of her 13-day-old son was arrested in Atlanta, officials said Monday.

>> Read more trending news

Authorities found Maria Sullivan, 26, of Sandy, Utah, after she made “some concerning statements” to staff members at Northside Hospital-Cherokee, according to the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office.

Sheriff’s spokeswoman Sgt. Marianne Kelley did not say what those statements were or why Sullivan was at the hospital. KSTU reported that she was seeking treatment but did not clarify what kind of treatment. 

Hospital staff members notified a sergeant at the hospital about the troublesome statements, and the official learned Sullivan had warrants on suspicion of murder, endangerment of a child and three counts of child abuse. 

Sullivan was discharged from the hospital and arrested just after 4:50 p.m. Sunday, Kelley said.

According KSTU, Sullivan’s son, who was born on Sept. 4 with no known health problems, was pronounced dead Sept. 17 by medical responders. Media reports say the boy suffered broken ribs, bruising and bleeding on the brain.

On the day of the child’s death, Sullivan left the boy in the sole care of her 21-year-old boyfriend, Dylan James Kitzmiller, while she called a friend to discuss her desire to “get away from Kitzmiller's abuse.” That same day, Sullivan said, she found Kitzmiller moving the child’s legs in a rough, awkward way. Later that night, Sullivan heard the child making noises and gasping for air before he stopped breathing, KSTU reported.

Sullivan told police Kitzmiller abused the child and used heroin daily, KUTV reported.

Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill said evidence showed Kitzmiller abused the boy and that Sullivan knew about it.

“There were statements that the child was being handled roughly by the arm and shoulder -- that Kitzmiller would throw the baby up in the air (and) catch him in the air,” Gill said, according to KUTV. “The girlfriend indicated there was a level of abuse going on. She was aware of this abuse. She took no steps to stop this or to take the child to safety.”

Sullivan is being held with no bond at the Cherokee County Adult Detention Center, Kelley said.

Kitzmiller was arrested Saturday on the same charges as Sullivan, according to reports.

'Magnum P.I.' reboot in the works: reports

CBS is working on a reboot of its classic show “Magnum P.I.,” according to reports.

>> Read more trending news

The first eight seasons of the original series aired on CBS in the 1980s. The show starred Tom Selleck.

The series reboot “follows Thomas Magnum (Selleck’s former role), a decorated ex-Navy SEAL who, upon returning home from Afghanistan, repurposes his military skills to become a private investigator. With help from fellow vets Theodore ‘TC’ Calvin and Orville ‘Rick’ Wright, as well as that of disavowed former MI:6 agent Juliet Higgins, Magnum takes on the cases no one else will, helping those who have no one else to turn to,” Variety magazine reported.

The reboot has already been given a “pilot-production commitment” from the network, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

It’s unclear whether Selleck will return for the reboot, but as he is currently under contract with CBS for the hit show “Blue Bloods,” it’s plausible that he could appear on the new “Magnum P.I.”

The reboot comes after a recent attempt to revive the series flopped.

Last year, ABC attempted to develop a sequel series, titled “Magnum,” which would have followed Magnum’s daughter who returns to Hawaii to take over her father’s P.I. firm. However, the show did not move beyond the development stage.

The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Neighbors make sure 95-year-old WWII is comfortable during daily walk

Harvey Djerf , a 95-year-old World War II veteran, doesn’t let his age stop him from taking his daily walks.

He takes the sojourns twice a day, all year long, and he’s been doing it for 65 years, Inside Edition reported.

But his neighbors are keeping an eye out for Djerf.

>> Read more trending news

Every so often, a random chair has been left out for Djerf to take a load off when he’s out for his walks.

“People saw me stopping and catching my breath,” Djerf told KARE. “They figured maybe Harvey needs a place to rest.”

Tom and Melanie Heuerman saw Harvey taking a break in other neighbors’ chairs. That’s when they added another one to his route.

The winter doesn’t stop Djerf, either, and his neighbors make sure Djerf can get safely to his seat by shoveling a path to his chairs, KARE reported.

Djerf said his walks keep him going and give him something to do since his wife, 95, suffered a stroke last year and has been living at an assisted living facility, Inside Edition reported.

Argument over shopping cart leads to fight at Walmart

Video of a shocking fight at a Cordova Walmart has gone viral. Police told FOX13 one woman was sent to a hospital as a result of the brawl.

According to a police report, officers were flagged down by a customer who was complaining that a woman was fighting inside the business.

When officers arrived on the scene, they found another woman on the ground with bruises. Police said she was crying.

>> Read more trending news

A Walmart manager told police he was stacking items when he heard a loud commotion and walked toward it. The manager said he then noticed two women fighting on the ground, and he tried to separate them.

Another witness told police that one woman asked another woman about a rolling cart and she replied, “Maybe other customers are using them if nothing is over there.”

Officers said the other woman became very angry, and she asked for a manager and then punched the clerk. The clerk punched the woman back, according to the report.

Police said other witnesses said the woman struck another clerk, as well. Both women who work at Walmart refused to prosecute.

One woman was transported to Baptist East in noncritical condition.

Walmart sent FOX13 the following statement:

“We work to provide a safe and secure environment for everyone in our stores. What is seen in this video is disturbing, and we are reviewing the situation to fully understand what happened.”

Meijer recalls vegetables for potential Listeria contamination

Meijer has recalled several vegetable products for a potential contamination.

Officials for Meijer, a retailer based in Grand Rapids, Michigan, announced the company has recalled various packaged Meijer-brand produce items due to a potential contamination of Listeria monocytogenes, an organism that can cause fatal infections in young children and elderly people.

>> Read more trending news

The recall affects products sold in Meijer stores in Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Wisconsin purchased Sept. 27 through Oct. 20. The items will be in plastic containers or foam trays with printed labels with various sizes and weights.

Meijer received notice of a possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination from Mann Packing, a Meijer supplier based in Salinas, California, that sources the Meijer branded produce items. Mann Packing officials told Meijer that evidence of potential Listeria monocytogenes contamination had been identified by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

No illnesses have been reported to date. View the full list of impacted products here.

Letter dated day before Titanic sank sells for $166,000

The letter is addressed to “Mother.”

“We had good weather while we were in Loudon (sic). It is quite green and nice in England now. This boat is a giant in size and fitted up like a palacial (sic) hotel.” 

>> Read more trending news

It is one of the last remaining letters to survive the doomed ship Titanic, and it recently sold at auction for a 120,000 pounds ($166,000) -- a record-price for a correspondence from the liner. 

The missive, penned by first-class passenger Alexander Oskar Holverson on the liner’s embossed stationery, is dated April 13, 1912 -- the day before the Titanic sank.

Auctioneers Henry Aldridge & Son predicted the item would go for 60,000 to 80,000 pounds ($79,000 to $106,000), according to CNN. The identity of the buyer wasn't disclosed. Iron keys from the ship also sold for 76,000 pounds ($100,000).

“The prices illustrate the continuing interest in the Titanic and her passengers and crew,” auctioneer Andrew Aldridge told Reuters. “I‘m delighted with the new world record for the Titanic letter. It reflects its status as the most important Titanic letter we have ever auctioned.”

The letter was sold by the Holverson family.

Alexander Oskar Holverson was a salesman who was traveling on the ocean liner’s maiden voyage with his wife, Mary Alice, who survived the sinking. The letter was found on his body a few days after the ship sank April 14, 1912. More than 1,500 people died. 

The letter ends with this line:

“It all goes well we will arrive in New York Wednesday A.M.”

Alleged cop-killer who ate own feces in court ruled incompetent, to undergo mental exam

A judge ruled that a man accused of gunning down a New Orleans police officer in 2015 is incompetent to stand trial after the defendant halted jury selection last week by smearing feces over his face and head, eating some of it as court personnel and spectators choked and gagged. 

Orleans Parish District Judge Karen Herman handed down the ruling on Thursday, the day after Travis Boys pulled the excrement from his suit pocket, where he apparently stashed it earlier in the day. NOLA.com said Herman ordered Boys to undergo a psychiatric evaluation so doctors could determine if his actions were due to mental illness or if they were his way of delaying the trial. 

“Erring on the side of caution, I’m declaring Mr. Boys incompetent,” Herman said. “I don’t want to have to do (a trial) twice.”

The Advocate in Baton Rouge reported that Boys will be sent to the state mental hospital in Jackson for evaluation. He will have another competency hearing on Nov. 30. 

Prosecutors in the case filed an appeal, which they lost over the weekend. Both the 4th Circuit Court of Appeal and the Louisiana Supreme Court declined to reverse the ruling.

Herman also declined to reconsider her decision on Monday, when prosecutors introduced a recorded phone call Boys made to his girlfriend Thursday night, NOLA.com reported. Boys made the call from another inmate’s account in what prosecutors say was an attempt to hide the call from investigators.

Prosecutor Inga Petrovich wrote in a motion that in the recording, Boys is “clearly aware of the circumstances going on in his case (and) makes reference to when he will be released, as well as the possible inability to call his girlfriend once he goes to the hospital.”

NOLA.com reported that Herman said Monday that state law requires that all proceedings be halted following an incompetency ruling, including new motions like the one brought to her Monday by the state. The judge did say, however, that the recording of the phone call would be sent to the doctors evaluating Boys’ mental status. 

Other recordings of Boys’ jailhouse phone calls will also be handed to the team working on his case.

“I’m accepting the jail tapes as authentic and providing them to the malingering team,” Herman said, according to the news site. 

>> Read more trending news

Orleans Parish District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro called Herman’s ruling “extremely disturbing” in a statement released last week following her decision. 

“I had hoped that this court was too intelligent to allow an accused cop-killer to hijack these proceedings, but I was incorrect,” Cannizzaro said in the statement, obtained by NOLA.com. “I fear that today’s decision will only encourage similarly situated defendants to engage in such misconduct in the future.”

Boys is charged with first-degree murder in the June 20, 2015, shooting death of Officer Daryle Holloway. The officer was transporting Boys to jail when Boys shot him inside his police SUV, the charges allege. 

Boys, who police say escaped custody and was at large for about 24 hours before being recaptured, faces life in prison if convicted. He has pleaded not guilty and not guilty by reason of insanity.

Boys’ defense team previously argued that he was not competent to stand trial, but Herman ruled against them last month in a hearing that lasted about six hours, NOLA.com reported. His lawyers cited his low IQ scores, a family history of schizophrenia and a 2014 incident in which he jumped from a second-floor window, breaking his ankle, as signs of his mental incompetency. 

Billy Sothern, one of Boys’ defense attorneys, again argued on Thursday that his client is not competent to aid in his own defense. In his argument, he recounted the disturbing details of Boys’ actions in front of potential jurors.

“He was between us, less than a foot away from each of us,” Sothern said, according to NOLA.com. “I began to smell something, turned to my right to see Mr. Boys smearing feces on his face and hair, and eating feces from his fingers.”

Herman at that point saw what Boys was doing and cleared the courtroom, Sothern said. Boys continued to eat excrement off his hand and, when his lawyers tried to talk to him, he appeared “unable to focus on (them) or even appear to listen,” the lawyer said. 

Sothern said that Boys later told doctors he was told about what he did in court, but that he did not remember doing it, NOLA.com reported.

Witnesses for the prosecution on Thursday tried to show that Boys’ actions were part of a calculated plan to avoid prosecution. Dr. Rafael Salcedo, one of the doctors who previously observed Boys and declared him competent to stand trial, testified that he “absolutely” believed the incident was orchestrated to delay the trial, NOLA.com said.

Sheriff’s Office attorney Blake Arcuri testified that the plastic bag from which Boys pulled the feces appeared to be a bag from the jail commissary. Surveillance footage from the jail appeared to show that Boys filled the bag before he was taken to court that day. 

NOLA.com reported that Petrovich argued that Boys smuggled the feces into court and waited to pull it out of his pocket when he believed it would result in his trial being delayed. 

Herman said in her ruling that the defendant’s actions and the subsequent media coverage had likely tainted a potential jury. 

The judge said Thursday that Boys, if found competent by the doctors assigned to assess him, may have forfeited his right to sit in the courtroom during his murder trial.

“What happened yesterday will not happen (then),” Herman said. 

Waka Flocka Flame will release ‘Flockaveli II’ in 2018

Waka Flocka Flame is finally ready to release “Flockaveli II.”

>> Read more trending news 

The Atlanta rapper said his first solo album in five years will arrive in early 2018.

“This is the fourth time I’ve made ‘Flockaveli II,’” he said in a statement. “I lost the original version when I lost my hard drives, and then I lost two more after that. With this version of the album, I just did it.”

The singles “Trap My (Expletive) Off,” produced by Louney G, and “Circles,” the EDM-brushed track featuring rapper Derez Deshon, preface the release of the album, Waka’s first since “Triple F Life: Friends, Fans & Family” in 2012.

The Gucci Mane protégé recorded 42 tracks for the album, but pared it down to 19. Other producers featured include Lex Leuger, Supa Mario and C Notes.

“An album is supposed to be personal. People want to hear me,” Waka said. “There was a whole bunch of frustration and anger making this album, but I want people to know the same as ‘Flockaveli II.’ Better delivery, better flow. This is a Waka Flocka album.”

Earlier this year, the MC, legally known as Juaquin James Malphurs,was acquitted of gun charges stemming from a 2014 arrest at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

Delta hiring 1,000 flight attendants

Delta Air Lines is hiring more than 1,000 flight attendants.

>> Read more trending news

The average entry-level flight attendant at Delta earns about $25,000 a year, “with an opportunity to earn more depending upon schedule,” according to airline officials.

Officials with Atlanta-based Delta said applicants must have a high school degree or GED, be at least 21 years old, be able to work in the United States and be fluent in English.

The ideal candidate is also fluent in a language other than English, has education beyond high school and more than a year of experience in customer service, patient care or a similar role. Other experience that helps includes work to ensure the safety or care of others, such as a teacher, military, EMT, firefighter, coach, law enforcement, lifeguard or nurse, according to Delta officials.

Airline officials said 150,000 people applied for about 1,200 flight attendant positions last year, and fewer than 1 percent of applicants were selected.

Delta officials said “based on those odds, it’s easier to get into an Ivy League school than to become a Delta flight attendant.”

To learn more about Delta’s flight attendant jobs, click here.

Hikers rescue dog who fell down mine shaft

Three hikers went on a journey into the woods of Colorado, and came out as heroes.

Portia Scovern and her boyfriend Preston Gladd were hiking in Park County, Colorado, when they heard sounds from a cave, The Summit Daily reported.

They thought it was a wild animal. 

>> Read more trending news 

But when they returned a week later, Gladd, Scovern and Gladd’s roommate, Gannon Ingels, said they found out it wasn’t a wild animal, but rather a dog that had fallen to the bottom of a mine shaft, KXRM reported.

The fall was at least 20 feet, KMGH reported.

The dog, who they found out was named Cheyenne, was not hurt, but was a little underweight and dehydrated. She’s since been returned to his owner, all thanks to Facebook, The Summit Daily reported.

The dog had been missing since Oct. 4 when he ran off and is believed to have been at the bottom of the mine for at least a week.

Renee Zellweger to play Judy Garland in new movie

Actress Renee Zellweger will play the lead role in a movie about the final year of Judy Garland’s life that will begin production in February 2018, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

>> Read more trending news

“Judy” will chronicle the true story of Garland as she arrives in swinging London in 1968 to perform in a series of sellout shows, according to the Hollywood Reporter. It has been nearly 30 years since Garland shot to fame as Dorothy in “The Wizard of Oz,” and as she prepares to perform, she battles with management, charms musicians and reminisces with friends and fans, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Garland died on June 22, 1969, in London at the age of 47 from an overdose of barbiturates.

Zellweger, who was born two months before Garland’s death, won an Academy Award in 2003 for Best Supporting Actress in the war drama film, “Cold Mountain.”

New York City’s Westin hotel sells $1,000 bagel

The Westin New York at Times Square doesn’t just offer views of the city’s famous concrete jungle -- it now offers a $1,000 bagel.

>> Read more trending news

Visitors can purchase the bagel, described as a a locally-sourced bagel topped with white truffle cream cheese, goji berry-infused Riesling jelly and golden leaf flakes, for a limited time between Nov. 1 and Dec. 15. Tax and tip are included in the price of the bagel, WPIX reported.

It must be ordered at least 24 hours in advance, WABC reported. 

The menu item first debuted in 2007 for a limited time.

At the time, Frank Tujague, chef and creator of the pricey breakfast item, said he was inspired to create something that simultaneously reflected his culinary skills and the essence of New York. 

“I wanted to create something that speaks to New York, and is also a reflection of my culinary passion for seasonality and fine ingredients,” he said, according to Reuters. “Bagels are a New York food landmark, which is where the base for this dish came from. White truffles are a simple, quality ingredient that takes the meal, or the bagel in this case, to the next level.”

A spokeswoman for the Westin said the bagel offering, which has returned for a limited time over the years, has been requested “yearly without fail.”

“Considering how pricing has risen in the past decade (try buying an apartment for the same price as it was in 2007), this bagel at its introductory cost is nearly a deal,” Westin officials said, according to NBC New York. 

White truffle is the second most expensive food in the world after caviar, according to the Westin spokeswoman.

All proceeds from the bagel will go to the Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen, New York City’s largest emergency food program, according to Fortune.

Hundreds of corgis invade beach for Corgi Con

Throngs of stubby-legged corgis and their owners filled the sands of Ocean Beach Saturday for Corgi Con

>> Read more trending news

Trump says there's 'no leadership in NFL'

President Donald Trump on Monday lamented what he called a lack of leadership in the NFL days after the league’s commissioner said no plans are in place to force football players to stand during the national anthem.

>> Read more trending news

“Two dozen NFL players continue to kneel during the National Anthem, showing total disrespect to our Flag & Country,” Trump tweeted on Monday morning. “No leadership in NFL!”

NFL commissioner Roger Goddell said last week that he believes players “should” stand for the anthem, but that team owners and other officials are focused on understanding the issues that are prompting the protests. He said that players will not be penalized if they choose to kneel during the anthem.

"I think our clubs all see this the same way -- we want our players to stand, we're going to encourage them to stand and we're going to continue to work on these issues in the community," Goodell said Tuesday at a news conference following the Fall League Meeting in New York.

Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick first started kneeling during the anthem last year, to protest police violence against minorities. The protest got mixed reactions, but other NFL players -- and players in other sports -- have since followed Kaepernick’s lead, to protest inequality.

>> Related: NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell wants players to stand during national anthem, memo says

“They're talking about criminal justice reform,” Goddell said last week. “They're talking about changes that, I think, will make our communities better -- that there's bipartisan support for and that need focus. … They're talking about equality issues, making sure we're doing everything we possibly can to give people an opportunity, whether it's an education or economic and what we can do to try to effectuate that. And we believe, with the players, that we can help them, we can support them. And those are our issues, national issues, American issues that are all important."

Trump suggested last month that NFL team owners should fire players who refuse to stand during the anthem, telling a crowd in Alabama that “that’s a total disrespect for our heritage.”

Goddell said last week that players “are not doing this in any way to be disrespectful to the flag, but they also understand how it's being interpreted, and we're dealing with those underlying issues."

Stolen World War II uniforms found years later at thrift store

Matt Stone found the visor hanging in the Halloween hats section at Goodwill.

A week later, he spied the older wool uniforms stuffed on the rack at the thrift store.

>> Read more trending news

Stone, 22, a collector of World War II memorabilia, a hobby he picked up from his great-grandfather, knew there was something special about the uniforms with the $4.99 price tags and the hat with the matching names written on them.

"It seemed odd to me that all the ribbons and insignias were still on it," Stone told KARE.

Turns out, the uniforms and hat were stolen from the Makkyla family about seven years ago.

Martin and his brother Jack served in World War II. Martin died in 1969 and Jack in 1981. Neither had children.

With some help, Stone was able to track down the family’s descendants, about 191 miles north. Their nieces were excited and in disbelief to be reunited with the uniforms.

“It’s something we didn't expect to see again,” Jane Boyer told KARE.

Stone was grateful to help get the uniforms back to their place.

"I hope they feel pretty happy that you know, a 22-year-old kid in this day and age is going to these stores saving this stuff and returning it to the family," Stone said.

Boyer, a quilter, showed her appreciation. She gave Stone a patriotic quilt covered in American flags.

Who are the Rohingya Muslims? 7 things to know about the 'world’s most persecuted minority'

Updated Oct. 23, 2017

More than 600,000 Rohingya refugees have fled a brutal military crackdown in the Buddhist majority country of Myanmar, where they are denied citizenship and reportedly face an array of human rights abuses, to seek refuge in Bangladesh.

>> Read more trending news

But many other Rohingya refugees have been turned away, leaving thousands stranded at sea.

Almost 40 percent of all Rohingya villages were empty last month, a Myanmar government spokesperson confirmed.

Zeid Ra‘ad al-Hussein, the United Nations human rights chief, has called what's happening to Rohingya in Myanmar “a textbook example of ethnic cleansing.”

A report published by global rights group Amnesty International detailed evidence of mass killings, torture, rape and forcible transfers of the Rohingya,  Al-Jazeera reported.

Who are the Rohingya and where do they live?

The Rohingya are a Muslim ethnic group living primarily in the Buddhist nation of Myanmar (or Burma). There are approximately 1.1 million Rohingya living in the country.

According to Al Jazeera, the Rohingya have been described as the “world’s most persecuted minority,” and have faced systematic persecution since Myanmar’s independence in the late 1940s.

Most Rohingya in Myanmar reside in the Rakhine State on the country’s western coast.

Rakhine State is regarded as one of the country’s poorest areas and lacks basic services in education and health care.

The Rohingya’s history in Myanmar

According to historians, the group has been residing in Arakan (now Rakhine State) since as early as the 12th century, Al Jazeera reported.

When the British ruled between 1824 and 1948, they administered Myanmar as a province of India and, thus, any migration of laborers between Myanmar and other South Asian countries (like Bangladesh) was considered internal. The majority of the native Myanmar population did not like that.

After gaining independence in 1948, the Burmese government still frowned upon any migration that occurred during the period of British rule, claiming it all to be illegal.

In fact, many Buddhists in Myanmar consider the Ronhingya to be Bengali, or people from Bangladesh.

The discriminatory 1982 Citizenship Law officially prevented them from obtaining citizenship.

And according to a Human Rights Watch report from 2000, this is the basis the Myanmar government uses to deny Rohingya citizenship in the country.

Over the years, military crackdowns on the Rohingya have forced hundreds of thousands to escape.

According to the HRW report, Rohingya refugees reported that the Burmese army had forcibly evicted them. Many also alleged widespread army brutality, rape and murder.

Between 1991 and 1992, more than 250,000 Rohingya refugees fled to southeastern Bangladesh. But with the influx of refugees, the Bangladeshi government insisted the refugees return to Arakan (Rakhine State).

By 1997, according to the HRW report, some 230,000 refugees returned.

That same year, the Burmese government said it would not accept any more returning refugees after Aug. 15, 1997, leading to a series of disturbances in Bangladeshi refugee camps.

The Human Rights Watch has called the crisis a deadly game of “human ping-pong.”

What’s happening to the Rohingya now?

Myanmar, a Buddhist-majority country, continues to deny the Rohingya citizenship, freedom to travel, access to education and the group still faces harsh systematic persecution.

In October 2016, the Burmese government blamed members of the Rohingya for the killings of nine border police, leading to a crackdown on Rakhine State villages in which troops were accused of rape, extrajudicial killing and other human rights abuses — all allegations they denied.

Satellite images have also shown Rohingya villages burning — at least 288 villages so far.

And most recently in August, violence erupted after a Rohingya armed rebel group called the Arakan Rohingya Salvatian Army (ARSA) attacked police posts and an army base in Rakhine, Al Jazeera reported.

ARSA has reportedly killed a dozen Burmese security personnel in the past. And according to the Washington Post, it’s unclear how much support the rebel group, which seeks an autonomous Muslim state for the Rohingya, actually has among the Rohingya.

Following the August event, civilians began paying the price for ARSA’s small insurgency as Burma’s military launched a “clearance operation,” which U.N. commisioner for human rights Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein has called “a textbook example of ethnic cleansing,” the Washington Post reported.

More than 600,000 Rohingya Muslims fled to Bangladesh to escape the aforementioned allegations of human rights abuses such as rape, murder and arson, according to the United Nations.

Women, children and the elderly made up the bulk of that group.

Approximately 40,000 have also settled in India and 16,000 of which have obtained official refugee documentation.

But severe flooding in Bangladesh and India have made conditions in refugee camps even worse and according to National Geographic, there have been reports of cholera outbreaks, water shortages and malnutrition.

Over the past three years, hundreds of thousands of Rohingya have tried to escape by boat to neighboring countries that refuse to let them in.

Approximately 8,000 migrants have been stranded at sea.

Why won’t other countries take them in?

Many of Myanmar’s neighboring countries, including Bangladesh and Thailand, refuse to take them in.

The Thai navy has actually turned them away.

Lex Rieffel, an expert on Southeast Asia at the Brookings Institution, told NPR in 2015 that the Buddhist-majority nation of Thailand has been battling an Islamist insurgency for decades and has "no stomach" for bringing in more Muslims.

“Where will the budget come from? That money will need to come from Thai people's taxes, right?” Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha told reporters in 2015.

Malaysia and Indonesia, despite being Muslim-majority nations, have also prevented Rohingya from entering their countries, citing “social unrest.” And Indonesia worries about “an uncontrolled influx.”

“What do you expect us to do?” Malaysian Deputy Home Minister Wan Junaidi Jafaar told The Guardian in 2015. “We have been very nice to the people who broke into our border. We have treated them humanely, but they cannot be flooding our shores like this.”

What is Aung San Suu Kyi saying?

The crisis has drawn worldwide criticism of Myanmar's government and its leader, Nobel Peace Prize recipient Aung San Suu Kyi

Most human rights activists have denounced Suu Kyi for not publicly condemning the Myanmar military’s treatment of the Rohingya.

According to the BBC, Suu Kyi said “a huge iceberg of misinformation” was distorting the crisis.

“We know very well, more than most, what it means to be deprived of human rights and democratic protection,” she is quoted as saying to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in a recent statement. “So, we make sure that all the people in our country are entitled to protection of their rights as well as ... not just political but social and humanitarian defence.”

But the misinformation or “fake news” is possibly generated by the Burmese government’s decision to deny media access to its troubled areas, BBC’s Tn Htar Swe said.

"If they allowed the UN or human rights bodies to go to the place to find out what is happening then ... misinformation is not going to take place.”

Condemnation of Suu Kyi’s inaction and response have led to calls for the rescindment of her Nobel Peace Prize, which she won in 1991 as a result of her long fight for democracy in Burma. According to the Washington Post, the Nobel Committee said that will not happen.

How is the world reacting to the Rohingya crisis?

Bangladesh, which is facing the largest influx of Rohingyas from Myanmar, has called on the international community to intervene.

International aid to much of Myanmar’s Rakhine State have been suspended, leaving more than 250,000 Rohingya Muslims without medical care, food and other vital humanitarian assistance, the Human Rights Watch reported last month.

“The United Nations, ASEAN and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation need to ramp up the pressure on Burma, and provide more assistance to Bangladesh, to promptly help Rohingya and other displaced people,” said Philippe Bolopion, deputy diretor for global advocacy at Human Rights Watch.

The U.S. State Department also announced plans last month to dispense about $32 million in humanitarian assistance to the Rohingya ethnic minority facing persecution in Myanmar’s Rakhine state.

“Through this support, the United States will help provide emergency shelter, food security, nutritional assistance, health assistance, psychosocial support, water, sanitation and hygiene, livelihoods, social inclusion, non-food items, disaster and crisis risk reduction, restoring family links, and protection to over 400,000 displaced persons in Burma and in Bangladesh,” according to the press release.

The Organization of Islamic Cooperation, the world's largest Muslim body, also issued a statement urging Muslim countries to work together to help the Rohingya refugees.

Earlier this year, the United Nations Human Rights Council approved an investigative mission, but was denied entry into Myanmar in June. And when an envoy entered in July, the visit was met with protests.

Last week, the U.N. Security Council condemned the violence, its first unified statement on Myanmar in nine years, the New York Times reported.

But, according to the New York Times, the U.N. is unlikely to act against Myanmar.

China also blocked Egypt’s efforts to add language for Rohingya refugees to be guaranteed the right to return to Myanmar from Bangladesh.

Both China and Russie hold veto power in the U.N. Security Council and can block efforts to sanction Myanmar.

More at NYTimes.com

Who is helping the Rohingya?

Aid groups continue efforts to reach Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar and send aid to refugee camps.

The United Nations has pledged roughly $340 million and according to Mark Lowcock of the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, the U.N. and its partners are seeking $434 million to help the Rohingya Muslims through February.

According to the Indian Express, India sent an aircraft with the first shipment of humanitarian assistance to Bangladesh for Rohingya Muslim refugees last month.

Bangladeshi citizens themselves are also among those providing aid and shelter to the many starving Rohingya refugees in their country.

Jordan’s queen, Queen Rania, said last week after visiting a refugee camp in Bangladesh that she was shocked by the refugees’ limited access to basic support and health care, the Dhaka Tribune reported.

“It is unforgivable that this crisis is unfolding, largely ignored by the international community," she said. "The world response has been muted. I urge the U.N. and the international community to do more to ensure we can bring peace to this conflict.”

According to the Human Rights Watch, the Tatmadaw True News Information Team announced a military-led investigation of security forces in the Rakhine State.

“We want to go home and we want peace. But I believe the world is watching our crisis and that they are trying to help us,” Rahimol Mustafa, a 22-year-old Rohingya Muslim told Al Jazeera in an interview.

Read Mustafa’s story on AlJazeera.com   

Mustafa fled Rakhine State a few weeks ago and is currently safe at a refugee camp in Bangladesh, but with “no shelter and no future.”

Donate to help the Rohingya Muslims at donate.unhcr.org

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